About Me

Thanks so much for visiting my blog!

This is my sixth year teaching, and I love it. I began teaching in K-2 learning support, where I co-taught first grade inclusion and K-2 resource room. For the next four years, I taught K-5 elementary emotional/behavioral support. I currently teach fifth grade learning support/resource room and K-2 Title 1 reading.

I have a Master's in Reading Education (K-12) with a Reading Specialist certification. I have a Bachelor's in Special Education (N-12) and Elementary Education (K-6), dual certification. I received the Rosemary Carroll Kazimer Medal for Excellence in Elementary Education in 2010.

My goal is to make learning as fun and engaging as possible. I'm very student-centered in my approach, implementing student interests and creativity. I work to set up a positive environment that allows students to take risks, work hard, interact, and have fun! I love brain based learning, whole brain teaching, and instruction geared toward student need. The educators I admire most are Rick Lavoie, Ron Clark, Eric Jensen, and Harry Wong.

Feel free to email me or contact me through the Home page of this blog.

Email A Peach for the Teach at apeachfortheteach@gmail.com

A Peach for the Teach

2 comments:

  1. I love the article on handling meltdowns, storms, rages, or tantrums. I am a mom of four boys and have experienced this with all of them at home and in school for the last ten years at least. I have two who are finally out of high school (but still have issues at times) and one in high school and one in junior high. My life, as well as theirs, would be SO much easier if teachers would listen to this advice! I have tried to tell them again and again, that I am not asking for special treatment per say, I am asking for support to help them be successful (my sons and the teachers), which will make all of our lives less stressful. Just so you know, I am a teacher myself so I am not by any means against teachers. I am going to share, once again, this information with my sons' teachers and hope it makes a difference!

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    1. Hi, Jackie! Thank you so much for your kind words! I really hope that the information helps your sons. I also wish more people would follow this advice. It's like denying glasses for someone with vision needs, or a wheelchair for someone with mobility needs! Students with "invisible disabilities" need supports, too. Your comment means a lot to me. Thank you!

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